Hearthstone HCT 2017 APAC Summer Playoffs decks, results, and analysis

Hearthstone Championship Tour 2017 Asia-Pacific Summer Playoffs were played on 9th and 10th September 2017 in multiple locations across Asia and Australia. 74 players had qualified for and participated in the tournament that consisted of seven rounds of Swiss followed by single-elimination top-8 playoffs.

In this post, I take a look at the decks and results of the tournament, including class distribution, archetypes, and archetype performance.

Results

The event was played in a best-of-five Conquest format with one ban.

First, the 74 players went through seven rounds of Swiss to determine the top-8 cut for single-elimination playoffs. After those seven rounds, Uya was the #1 seed as the only undefeated player. Four players finished with a 6-1 record, and 9 finished at 5-2, so tiebreakers were needed. Three players made it in to the top-8 through tiebreakers: Cocosasa, Tom60229, and Tako3.

In the single-elimination playoffs, the main importance was on the first round: the top-4 players would secure their spots in the global Summer Championships.

Here is the playoff bracket and results:

The APAC region’s representatives for the Summer Championships 2017 are Surrender, Cocosasa, Uya, and Tom60229.

Class distribution in the tournament and in top-8

Blizzard sends out the decklists of the event to players and selected media sources, which usually publish some of them. This time, YAYtears published images of all the decks on a Google Doc.

Classes in the entire tournament from the most popular to the least popular:

  • Druid: 74 – every single player brought Jade Druid!
  • Priest: 70
  • Warrior: 49
  • Paladin: 44
  • Warlock: 23
  • Mage: 20
  • Shaman: 14
  • Rogue: 2
  • Hunter: 0

Compared to the Europe Playoffs one week before, Druid retained its 100% representation. This time every single Druid was a Jade Druid, the few Aggro Druids had disappeared. Priest also increased its share even further. Warlock, perhaps inspired by Pavel’s win with Handlock in his lineup, was also more popular than one week ago, still behind Warrior and Paladin though, both of which kept their representation roughly the same.

Shaman, Rogue, and Hunter were the losers. Hunter disappeared altogether, and Rogue may have as well, with only two players bringing it. Shaman crashed from 38 people bringing it in Europe to only 14 in Asia-Pacific.

Classes in the top-8 from the most popular to the least popular:

  • Druid: 8
  • Priest: 8
  • Paladin: 6
  • Warrior: 5
  • Warlock: 3
  • Mage: 1
  • Shaman: 1
  • Rogue: 0
  • Hunter: 0

The rich got even richer when it comes to top-8. No Rogues. One Shaman out of 14. One Mage out of 20. For the most part, it was five classes that made it to the top.

Archetype distribution by class and archetype performance in top-8

Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest still ruled, but they did not rule supreme. Two players, Cocosasa and DDaHyoNi, went 5-2 in the Swiss while targeting both decks. DDaHyoNi missed out on the top-8 on tiebreakers while Cocosasa made it all the way to the Grand Final. This turned the results in top-8 upside down, with neither Jade Druid nor Kazakus Priest reaching a positive win rate.

APAC Summer Playoffs were immensely more interesting and enjoyable than Europe Summer Playoffs, if you are interested in seeing off-meta decks. How about these decks in top-8: Big Priest, Exodia Mage, Keleseth Aggro Paladin, and Kazakus Warlock. That was quite incredible to witness.

Of course, every single player brought Jade Druid. Even the players who targeted Jade Druid brought Jade Druid. Seven of the players in top-8 brought Kazakus Priest, and the one who did not brought Big Priest instead. In that sense, there is still some sense of normalcy in the world.

Handlock and Taunt Warrior, two success stories from Europe Summer Playoffs, increased in representation, but had a hard time carrying their players to the top. Only one Taunt Warrior made it to the top-8, whereas three Warlocks made it, two Handlocks and one Kazakus Warlock. Kazakus Warlock, together with Exodia Mage, was the most successful archetype in the single-elimination playoffs with a 2-0 record. Polarized metagames can produce some interesting and polarized deck choices, even when hope for change seems all but lost.

The most popular archetypes in the entire tournament:

  • 74 Jade Druids
  • 66 Kazakus Priests
  • 36 Murloc Paladins
  • 32 Pirate Warriors
  • 19 Handlocks
  • 17 Taunt Warriors
  • 11 Evolve Shamans

Full archetype distribution in the entire tournament:

Paladin

  • 36 Murloc Paladins
  • 7 Control Paladins
  • 1 Aggro Paladin

Warrior

  • 32 Pirate Warriors
  • 17 Taunt Warriors

Druid

  • 74 Jade Druids

Mage

  • 7 Freeze Mages
  • 6 Control Mages
  • 3 Secret Mages
  • 2 Exodia Mages
  • 2 Hybrid Freeze Mages

Rogue

  • 1 Miracle Rogue
  • 1 Keleseth Elemental Rogue

Shaman

  • 11 Evolve Shamans
  • 2 N’Zoth Control Shamans
  • 1 Jade Shaman

Priest

  • 66 Kazakus Priests
  • 2 Big Priests
  • 2 Silence Priests

Warlock

  • 19 Handlocks
  • 4 Kazakus Warlocks

No Hunters

Archetype distribution and performance in the top-8 playoffs (excluding mirror matches):

Paladin

  • 5 Murloc Paladins 7-4
  • 1 Aggro Paladin 2-1

Warrior

  • 4 Pirate Warriors 4-3
  • 1 Taunt Warrior 0-3

Druid

  • 8 Jade Druids 2-8

Mage

  • 1 Exodia Mage 2-0

Shaman

  • 1 Evolve Shaman 1-0

Priest

  • 7 Kazakus Priests 4-5
  • 1 Big Priest 2-3

Warlock

  • 2 Handlocks 1-0
  • 1 Kazakus Warlock 2-0

Lineup details

With all deck information available, we can also take a look at the full lineups that players brought.

Jade Druid + Kazakus Priest + Pirate Warrior + Murloc Paladin was still the standard lineup, brought by 21 players out of 74. Overall, two aggro decks in addition to Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest was the most common lineup choice, and one that carried four players to the top-8. Solid decks and solid piloting can still go a long way, even with no tricks attached.

The counter to that, Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest complemented by two anti-aggro decks was nearly as popular, but had nowhere near the same level of success. Only one player piloted such a lineup to the top-8. Aggro decks have some inherent advantage in the Kazakus Priest matchup.

Bringing one control deck and one aggressive deck in addition to Druid and Priest was a rarer strategy, but one that had good results. Three players in the top-8 had some variation of this style.

Here are all lineups in order of popularity:

Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 21
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Pirate Warrior 5
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Murloc Paladin 4
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior Control Paladin 4
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Evolve Shaman 3
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Taunt Warrior 3
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior Control Mage 3
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior Freeze Mage 3
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Control Mage Control Paladin 2
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Evolve Shaman Murloc Paladin 2
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Freeze Mage 2
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Kazakus Warlock Evolve Shaman 2
Jade Druid Big Priest Elemental Rogue Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Big Priest Exodia Mage Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Evolve Shaman Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Freeze Mage Control Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Freeze Mage Evolve Shaman 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Hybrid Freeze Mage 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Jade Shaman 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Hybrid Freeze Mage Evolve Shaman 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Kazakus Warlock Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Pirate Warrior Aggro Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Pirate Warrior Secret Mage 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior Evolve Shaman 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior Kazakus Warlock 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Taunt Warrior N’Zoth Control Shaman 1
Jade Druid Miracle Rogue Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid N’Zoth Control Shaman Taunt Warrior Control Mage 1
Jade Druid Secret Mage Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Silence Priest Exodia Mage Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Silence Priest Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Secret Mage Murloc Paladin 1

 

Lineups that reached the top-8 were:

Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Pirate Warrior Murloc Paladin 3
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Murloc Paladin 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Handlock Taunt Warrior 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Kazakus Warlock Evolve Shaman 1
Jade Druid Kazakus Priest Pirate Warrior Aggro Paladin 1
Jade Druid Big Priest Exodia Mage Murloc Paladin 1

Can you target Jade Druid?

With Cocosasa reaching the Grand Final while never banning Druid, the obvious question is, has almost everyone been wrong all along? Can you actually target Jade Druid?

There were actually two players at 5-2 after the Swiss with an anti-Druid lineup: Cocosasa and DDaHyoNi. Cocosasa brought Jade Druid, Big Priest, Exodia Mage, and Murloc Paladin whereas DDaHyoNi brought Jade Druid, Silence Priest, Exodia Mage, and Murloc Paladin.

Two noticeably similar lineups, and the only two players to bring Exodia Mage to the tournament. Both also recognized that they want to bring some other Priest than Kazakus, with Cocosasa opting for Big Druid and DDaHyoNi opting for Silence Priest.

No one attempted quite the same at Europe Playoffs. NewMeta brought Aggro Druid, Silence Priest, Murloc Paladin, and Pirate Warrior, an aggressive lineup targeting Druid. It did not work out. Theo brought Big Priest alongside Jade Druid, Murloc Paladin, and Evolve Shaman. It did not work out. Exodia Mage is a piece that no one brought in Europe, and it did a lot of work for players in Asia-Pacific.

What did these anti-Druid lineups lose to?

Cocosasa lost three series overall, twice to Surrender and once to Uya. Both had two very aggressive deck to complement their Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest: Murloc Paladin and Pirate Warrior for Surrender and Aggro Paladin and Pirate Warrior for Uya.

DDaHyoNi missed the single-elimination playoffs on tiebreakers, so he lost two series in the tournament, to Uya and Kribo. Kribo had Taunt Warrior and Handlock to complement Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest.

What did they win against, then?

Cocosasa won against:

  • Crataris (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Handlock)
  • Bao (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Control Mage, Taunt Warrior)
  • Waterrupt (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior)
  • Tako3 (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior)
  • Tom60229 (twice) (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Evolve Shaman, Kazakus Warlock)
  • Machamp (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Handlock)

DDaHyoNi won against:

  • 撒旦降臨 (Jade Druid, Big Priest, Murloc Paladin, Elemental Rogue)
  • PinPingho (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Evolve Shaman, Kazakus Warlock)
  • GunMo (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Evolve Shaman)
  • Osuttyo (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior)
  • Nukesaku (Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior)

Without access to specific game data, it is difficult to draw conclusions. Both anti-Druid lineups generally lost to lineups that included two aggressive decks, so they could only ban one and had to leave one up.

On the other hand, Murloc Paladin and Pirate Warrior was the most popular combo in the tournament in addition to Jade Druid and Kazakus Priest (21 players brought those four decks), and Cocosasa and DDaHyoNi managed to grab a number of wins against that lineup as well, four wins overall.

It does seem like their strategy was not quite as simple as targeting Jade Druid. In fact, it consisted of three parts:

  • Bring decks that are strong against Jade Druid
  • Bring decks that are strong against Kazakus Priest
  • Ban the most aggressive deck your opponent has, and preferably they have only one aggro deck

They managed to hit a sweet spot in the evolving tournament meta: many players sought to counter Pirate Warrior + Murloc Paladin, and the Exodia Mage lineup was able to counter those lineups that had Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, and one aggro deck.

Even though targeting Druid can get a little complicated, and requires some additional parts to fall in place, it was proven that should a tournament environment become too predictable, it is possible to bring decks that target that specific meta, even when it seems incredibly powerful. The attempts to do so in Europe Playoffs failed, but the lineups in APAC Playoffs had learned some lessons from that tournament.

Deck spotlights

There is some good stuff to feature in deck spotlights! If the spotlights from last week’s Europe Summer Championships focused on decks that were widely brought and took a look at the differences between various lists, this time there are plenty of rarer decks to examine. This is what tournament meta has become!

Cocosasa’s Big Priest

Big Priest finally made it, the breakthrough on main stage! One Big Priest in the Europe Playoffs. 100% increase coming in to APAC Playoffs at two, and one of them made it all the way to the finals!

Big Priest has big minions for days. The dream opener is to find Barnes and roll a good minion from it, preferably Y’Shaarj, but most big minions will do. Once that 1/1 inevitably bites the dust, it can then be resurrected in its full form with Eternal Servitude. Turn four 1/1 Y’Shaarj into a Turn five 10/10 Y’Shaarj, anyone?

If Barnes is nowhere to be found, there is still Shadow Essence, which summons a 5/5 copy of a random minion in your deck. Barnes is just about the only bad roll from that spell, all others can, once again, be resurrected with full stats should the original die.

The only way around those early big minions is to transform the first one to prevent it from being resurrected. Hex and Polymorph work great, but they are not widely played right now.

Even if all of that fails and Big Priest is forced to play minions at their full mana cost at around eight to ten, it still packs a good removal package – this is no Highlander deck – so while its win rate takes a dip if it cannot cheat out big guns early, it still has a chance.

Deck code: AAECAa0GCB6iCaUJqKsChbgCt7sCws4CkNMCC8sI0wrXCqGsArW7Aui/Auq/AtHBAuXMAubMArTOAgA=

See it in action:

Big Priest vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=05h39m59s

Big Priest vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=07h41m39s

Big Priest vs Murloc Paladin: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=07h54m56s

Big Priest vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=08h23m00s

Big Priest vs Kazakus Priest: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=08h39m25s

Cocosasa’s Exodia Mage

How much Armor does it take to rope out the Mage and survive the one-turn-kill combo from Exodia Mage? Estimates vary, but it is more than 100, maybe even more than 200. Fatigue Warrior can perhaps pull it off one day with endless Bring It On’s, but currently there are no decks that can survive Exodia Mage’s combo.

The combo is four Sorcerer’s Apprentices and Archmage Antonidas for endless free Fireballs. They cannot all obviously be played in a single turn, but the Mage Quest gives the Mage an extra turn, which is enough to set up the combo. The earliest possible combo turn is Turn eight, but usually it takes a bit longer to complete the quest and find all the combo pieces.

In Cocosasa’s list, there are four card that copy Sorcerer’s Apprentices: two copies each of Molten Reflection and Simulacrum. Therefore, usually the combo timing depends on quest completion and drawing Archmage Antonidas, there are plenty of Sorcerer’s Apprentices around.

A true combo deck, Exodia Mage is one of the few slow decks that can take on Jade Druid. In turn, it is terrible against aggro decks that just wipe the floor with it before it gets anywhere near its combo. Mage has plenty of tools to stall with freezes and Ice Blocks, and possibly random additional Freezes and Ice Blocks, but usually aggro decks are still just too fast. Everyone else better be wary.

Deck code: AAECAf0EBO0EuAiBsgLQwQINigHAAZwCyQOrBMsE5gT4B5KsAsHBApjEAtrFArnRAgA=

See it in action:

Exodia Mage vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=05h10m05s

Exodia Mage vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=08h04m55s

Uya’s Aggro Paladin

Uya decided that Murloc are not for him. Prince Keleseth sounds better. Perhaps this is, indeed, the future of Aggro Paladin, as Uya rolled over opposition with a 9-3 record in the tournament overall (2-1 in single-elimination playoffs).

Prince Keleseth is the key card in the deck. The two-mana Legendary minion buffs all minions that are still in your deck (not in your hand or on the board) by +1/+1, so an early Prince Keleseth makes every single minion you play from there on that much more powerful, and able to just overpower even decks such as Murloc Paladin and Pirate Warrior. On the other hand, if the Prince is nowhere to be found, the deck loses some of its power. It can still push through with buffs and a ton of card draw from Divine Favor and Small-Time Recruits.

Deck code: AAECAaToAgbUBZG8Ary9ArnBAuvCApziAgxG8gGnBfUFzwbuBq8H5QfZrgK6vQLjywKVzgIA

See it in action:

Aggro Paladin vs Murloc Paladin: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=02h27m55s

Aggro Paladin vs Pirate Warrior: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=02h56m30s

Aggro Paladin vs Kazakus Priest: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=06h31m17s

Tom60229’s Kazakus Warlock

Kazakus Warlock or Handlock? Handlock is more consistent in finding its key removal pieces and early-game threats in the form of Mountain Giant and Twilight Drake (both are also present in Kazakus Warlock as one-offs), but Kazakus Warlock has a couple of strong power plays of its own: Kazakus and Krul the Unshackled.

With Krul and Bloodreaver Gul’dan, Kazakus Warlock is able to populate the board with powerful Demon minions twice: first clearing its hand with Krul and later on resummoning all of that good stuff with Bloodreaver Gul’dan. Krul also enables the deck to play Doomguard despite its discard effect, as it can be summoned for free with Krul, and it can also still be used in regular fashion, sacrificing some cards, when the need is great enough or when that extra reach can push for lethal damage.

Lord Jaraxxus plays a similar dual role in the deck: it can come out of Krul as a 3/15 minion that is hard to get rid of, or it can offer a health buff in a pinch, even though it is generally much less desirable than Bloodreaver Gul’dan.

Deck code: AAECAf0GHooB9wTtBfIFiQbbBooHkge2B+EH+weNCMQIzAjzDNi7ArC8Atm8At28Av2/ApvCAuTCAsrDAt7EAtPFAufLAqLNAvfNAsLOApfTAgAA

See it in action:

Kazakus Warlock vs Kazakus Priest: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=28m13s

Kazakus Warlock vs Taunt Warrior: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=04h10m00s

Kazakus Warlock vs Jade Druid: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=07h11m45s

Surrender’s Murloc Paladin

The final deck spotlight is the most normal one, a Murloc Paladin, but I did not feature it at Europe Playoffs, so it does deserve a look. This aggressive archetype also performed better in APAC Summer Playoffs than it did in Europe, and Surrender performed particularly well, going 3-0 with the deck in the top-8.

Surrender opted to run the Corpsetaker version with one Stormwatcher that gives Corpsetaker Windfury in addition to Taunt, Divine Shield, and Lifesteal from Wickerflame Burnbristle or two of those from Tirion Frodring or Righteous Protector, should any of them still be in the deck when Corpsetaker is played.

Another interesting tech choice is Crazed Alchemist that is able to deal with annoying Doomsayers and also turn any high-health minion, especially with Windfury or Spikeridged Steed on it, into a dangerous killing machine.

The deck is aggressive and it just keeps pushing.

Deck code: AAECAZ8FBqEG+ga8vQLjvgK5wQLvwgIM2wOvB6cI06oC2a4Cs8ECncICscICiMcC48sCps4ClugCAA==

See it in action:

Murloc Paladin vs Pirate Warrior: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=03h18m46s

Murloc Paladin vs Kazakus Priest: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=06h18m30s

Murloc Paladin vs Big Priest: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/173643739?t=07h54m56s

Appendix 1: Decks by player in top-8

Uya:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Aggro Paladin
  • Pirate Warrior

Kribo:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Taunt Warrior
  • Handlock

Machamp:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Murloc Paladin
  • Handlock

Surrender:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Murloc Paladin
  • Pirate Warrior

Horo:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Murloc Paladin
  • Pirate Warrior

Cocosasa:

  • Jade Druid
  • Big Priest
  • Murloc Paladin
  • Exodia Mage

Tom60229:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Evolve Shaman
  • Kazakus Warlock

Tako3:

  • Jade Druid
  • Kazakus Priest
  • Murloc Paladin
  • Pirate Warrior

Appendix 2: HCT APAC Summer Playoffs 2017 top-8 matches

Raw data on matches, lineups, and bans.

Quarter-final 1: Uya vs Tako3

Uya: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Aggro Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Tako3: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Bans: Uya banned Jade Druid and Tako3banned Jade Druid.

Games:

Pirate Warrior wins against Murloc Paladin

Aggro Paladin loses to Murloc Paladin

Kazakus Priest loses to Kazakus Priest

Aggro Paladin wins against Pirate Warrior

Kazakus Priest wins against Pirate Warrior

Uya 3 – Tako3 2.

Quarter-final 2: Surrender vs Horo

Surrender: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Horo: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Bans: Surrender banned Jade Druid and Horo banned Jade Druid.

Games:

Murloc Paladin wins against Pirate Warrior

Pirate Warrior loses to Pirate Warrior

Kazakus Priest wins against Murloc Paladin

Pirate Warrior wins against Murloc Paladin

Surrender 3 – Horo 1.

Quarter-final 3: Kribo vs Tom60229

Kribo: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Taunt Warrior, Handlock

Tom60229: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Evolve Shaman, Kazakus Warlock

Bans: Kribo banned Jade Druid and Tom60229 banned Jade Druid.

Games:

Kazakus Warlock wins against Taunt Warrior

Evolve Shaman wins against Taunt Warrior

Kazakus Priest wins against Taunt Warrior

Kribo 0 – Tom60229 3.

Quarter-final 4: Machamp vs Cocosasa

Machamp: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Handlock

Cocosasa: Jade Druid, Big Priest, Murloc Paladin, Exodia Mage

Bans: Machamp banned Jade Druid and Cocosasa banned Murloc Paladin.

Games:

Jade Druid loses to Exodia Mage

Handlock wins against Murloc Paladin

Jade Druid loses to Big Priest

Jade Druid loses to Murloc Paladin

Machamp 1 – Cocosasa 3.

Semi-final 1: Uya vs Surrender

Uya: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Aggro Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Surrender: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Bans: Uya banned Jade Druid and Tako3banned Jade Druid.

Games:

Pirate Warrior wins against Kazakus Priest

Kazakus Priest loses to Murloc Paladin

Aggro Paladin wins against Kazakus Priest

Kazakus Priest loses to Kazakus Priest

Kazakus Priest loses to Pirate Warrior

Uya 2 – Surrender 3.

Semi-final 2: Tom60229 vs Cocosasa

Tom60229: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Evolve Shaman, Kazakus Warlock

Cocosasa: Jade Druid, Big Priest, Murloc Paladin, Exodia Mage

Bans: Tom60229 banned Exodia Mage and Cocosasa banned Evolve Shaman.

Games:

Kazakus Warlock wins against Jade Druid

Kazakus Priest loses to Jade Druid

Jade Druid loses to Murloc Paladin

Jade Druid loses to Big Priest

Tom60229 1 – Cocosasa 3.

Grand Final: Surrender vs Cocosasa

Surrender: Jade Druid, Kazakus Priest, Murloc Paladin, Pirate Warrior

Cocosasa: Jade Druid, Big Priest, Murloc Paladin, Exodia Mage

Bans: Surrender banned Jade Druid and Cocosasa banned Pirate Warrior.

Games:

Murloc Paladin wins against Big Priest

Jade Druid loses to Exodia Mage

Jade Druid loses to Murloc Paladin

Jade Druid wins against Big Priest

Kazakus Priest wins against Big Priest

Surrender 3 – Cocosasa 2.

 

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